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A New Home for Creative Educational Ecosystems–Sol Terra!

I am so grateful for the perfect timing of the grand opening of Sol Terra–conveniently located right downtown Old Palm Harbor, a bicycle ride away, I could not have asked for a more perfect place!

Dem Bones

King James

We begin this weekend with our ‘on demand’ Permaculture Workshop series: “Design Your Home Foodscape”, which is a PDC (Permaculture Design Certificate) qualified course, with a twist! Normally, this course is 72 hours–often onsite for a 12 day intensive, which is simply out of reach for many who work or have family obligations. So, we designed this course with you in mind–it happens two weekends per month, 8 hours per weekend, and if you can’t make it one of the weekend days, we are also adding one weekday evening to cover the material missed in that session. Accessibility is the key, so you can pay for this course by the day, the weekend, or save a bunch of dough by pre-paying the entire course upfront.

Bee Happytat

So, what are you waiting for? This is the lowest cost and most flexible certifiable course out there! Oh, and did I mention–no long boring lectures, either–we cater to all learning types, and each weekend will have onsite analyses, hands-on activities, and fun, creative learning games!  Pre-Register on Meetup, or come a little early on Saturday (Class starts at 10AM each Saturday) to register before class.  I look forward to sharing your journey through sustainability into resilience and regeneration!

Let’s Get Durty!

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Cultivating Community:  The 2nd Annual Florida Permaculture Convergence

Category            Social Permaculture

 

The very first thing which comes to my mind post-convergence is this now-famous quote:  “The map is not the territory”, after months and months of meeting and planning and discussing and deliberating, we pulled it off—a ‘more mature’ event than the first—a progression down the path to mapping and connecting our community.   And what a community!  Holy cow, as I go through, card by card, the results of the Regional Roundup (yes, actually—I did in fact volunteer for this honor, as oftentimes this sorting and compiling is somewhat soothing.  Must be those 20 years in accounting, I dunno.)   I am amazed, yet again, at the extraordinary glimpse of the underbelly of this State such a gathering allows.  We are more diverse…stronger, hardier, and far more connected than we know.  Aho.  (Yes, I meant that to rhyme, yet another oddity.)

As in virtually every permaculture gathering, it rained.  It didn’t just rain, in fact—the deluge on opening day Friday was such that it, no doubt, kept many arrivals from happening that day.  The 2 – 2½  hour trip it should have been for me turned out to be five hours, most of it at a jerking, clunking, sputtering 35 miles an hour—the truck does not like rain.  The soaked, shivering, dripping bunch in the registration tent when I arrived were so reminiscent of Cuba that I immediately felt at home.  There is something about the state of discomfort, that once it has been reached—that’s it–there you are.

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Sandhill Farm

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We easily managed to cobble together 20 or so people for a tour of a local tiny eco-home, with its amazing array of fruit trees and organic and biodynamic methodology.  The area surrounding Crooked Lake on the Lake Wales Ridge is an awe-inspiring pocket of diversity, and both Hunter and Linda, our hosts for the tour, really know their history, so the tour was quite the treat!

The rest of the weekend went pretty much the same way—nothing quite as planned, perhaps, yet still rich with the compost of the community already formed.  To say the event was ‘enriching’ would be an understatement—it truly was cultural cultivation.  We could not have chosen a more fortunate spot for this gathering–H.E.A.R.T. is not only one of the best examples of permaculture principles and applied ethics in Florida, it is also located in one of the most diverse regions.

officerfriendlyAnd, now I must digress into the realm of Pinellas County authorities, and “Officer Unfriendly”—the harsh glare of reality outside of those happy permie, weed-infested weekends.  Because, no matter that I have taken great care to remain under the radar, regardless of my hours upon hours (upon hours and hours) of back-breaking labor and uncharacteristically pleasant and neighborly demeanor… ‘the man’ is after me.   Because I chose to share my journey with the public, and divulged such things as the (extra four) loads of mulch I had to scramble to deal with, once Pasco County deemed my yard their new favorite dumping ground.  Because I like to experiment with designs, such as combining my freestanding water colleBee Happytatction and hopefully graceful, artistic structure with a Warka, now used in Ethiopia for village water collection, miles from other potable water sources.  Because I like to share my findings with other like-minded people in the community.  Because my yard(s) do not look like cookie-cutter manicured, chemical-laden, water-sucking, bee-hating landscapes—I get to take my time to pay a visit to the County courthouse, to apply in retrospect for permits for dirt which has been used, and for structures and cultivation which no one has complained about.  Yes, this is a rant, because I chose to invite the public in, thinking that if only they knew what I was about, that the whole idea is about helping people (People Care), and saving the planet (Earth Care), that ‘they’ could not possibly choose to stop me, and even if they did try, they would not succeed.  So much for thinking.

As was said at the convergence—in my intro to the keynote speaker panel, I compared this group of permies–not as ditch-diggers, ‘in the trenches’–but as a swale, the event on the whole was very swale-like, an appropriate application of a design technology for the purpose of slowing down, absorbing, and creating an absorbent layer of material, which all of us have access to.  The panel participants have been at it here, in this state, for anywhere from one to ten years, and there are those not present who have been at it twice as long.  One might think we’d have re-charged the aquifers by now, but there are forces, still, running contrary to our ‘Mother Nature’.  The greatest of these forces is not, as one might think, “The Man”, but is ignorance.  It is the sheer weight of mis-information fed to the masses every day, the tick-tock sleepytime lull of our society’s metronome and mantras:  “get a job”, “pay the bills”, “sit still”, “mind your manners, ”be good, Johnny”…”clean your plate”.  Nobody warned us (ok, a few did), that our plates were heaped with poison.

It should come as no great surprise to those who know me that I have taken on the task of undermining such acceptance of “ignorance is bliss, ‘Tis folly to be wise”, when said folly leads us to…well, pretty much where we are, on this planet.  I’ve pretty much had it, in fact—for one who does not believe in terminology or strategies of war, this uphill battle has become, for me, much as I remember the battlefield of Gettysburg—over a century later, the stink and despair hang over the place like a dark cloud of carrion birds.  So, my mentor Dave Jacke says:  “…instead of focusing only on the size of our footprint, we need to increase our handprint”  [paraphrased].  I will not share my evil visualizations of how one might just go about increasing ones’ handprint, flapping and jazz hands notwithstanding.  It is encouraging to know, to be in the company of others who know, that the future lies, not in the hands of those who have already done so much damage, but in our own hands.  The simple act of being in the presence of, granted, a very small percentage of the population, but one which is growing daily—less than half of our 200 or so attendees this year were also part of the 200 last year—is an indication of the hidden masses underlying this great, green iceberg.  Or, perhaps a tree is an even better metaphor, as our glaciers are melting, because over half of the body of trees and many other plants, is below the ground.  Like mycelium, the invisible structures we are forming through these convergences are creating a tightly woven web of inter-connectionThe basic idea, and evidence from our experience…is that as people feel more connected and aligned, the thought of collective action becomes that much more inviting and its potential impact that much greater and longer lasting.”  The more people I meet and converse with from these connections, the more I hear how good it is to have someone to talk to who “gets it”.   These connections are now forming on a very basic, root level—deep, shallow, or broadscale.  As we continue to grow, as a community, and as each of us individually takes a look at our own inner landscapes, and whether that design serves us—the entire ecosystem will mature, revealing the natural, inherent design.  Eventually, the hope and design is that this polyculture will eventually sort itself into guilds—true, needs-and-yields based design, where the overall stress to each component – what Dave calls ‘resource partitioning’, in which cooperation is essential, and competition minimized.

In people systems, this requires a high level of self-actualization from the individual components—again, the requirement here is that each person does, has done, and continues on a regular basis to do the work on his or her own inner landscape.  Unless we understand what our own needs really are, we can’t hope to become enmeshed in a highly developed system based on needs and yields.  This process cannot happen, outside of a community, which is what is at the core of the current PDC certificate debate—many feel that “permaculture is a design science”, therefore can be taught virtually.  I believe that the environment of the digital age is very efficient for delivering the bulk of the informational goods, and it completely ignores the majority of what makes this study a ‘culture’, and not a ‘science’ alone.  Culture does not occur in a vacuum, and we cannot effectively teach or learn the components of social permaculture unless we spend time in a group with other people (uncomfortable though that may be, at times!).  So…when would now be a good time to get out there and learn some, hands on, with some other like-minded people?

 

© Loretta Buckner, 2014, We Grow From Here

Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Loretta Buckner and WeGrowFromHere.com with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

 

Resources:

Thomas Gray “Ode on a Distant Prospect of Eton College”

scold’s bridle

Why Networks for Social Change?   “Thinking in terms of networks can enable us see with new eyes.”

– Harold Jarche

2nd Annual Florida Permaculture Convergence

P.I.N.A.

H.E.A.R.T.

 


2 Comments

Use Edges and Value the Marginal

Category            Permaculture Principles

‘Don’t think you are on the right track just because it is a well-beaten path’

This was just too good not to share, from “Essence of Permaculture”, Holmgren:

Eastern spiritual traditions and martial arts regard peripheral vision as a critical sense that connects us to the world quite differently to focused vision.  Whatever is the object of our attention, we need to remember that it is at the edge of anything – system or medium, that the most interesting events take place; design that sees edge as an opportunity rather than a problem is more likely to be successful and adaptable. In the process, we discard the negative connotations associated with the word “marginal” in order to see the value in elements that only peripherally contribute to a function or system.in rural development work, the focus on staple crops, prime agricultural land and clearly articulated aims and values within communities frequently leads to undervaluing, ignorance and destruction of wild species, marginal spaces, along with the less visible needs of women, the disadvantaged and the landless.”

Oh, those edges…I’ve looked at edges from both sides now…and whether the margins be brambled forest or concrete jungle, this is indeed where the juicy stuff happens.  The mere mention of ‘weeds’ is enough to cause many a stalwart, upright human to bend and resemble our knuckle-dragging cousins.  Is this genetic?  I suppose I’ve been a hippie too long, because I see nothing wrong with a few green things ‘out of place’, and in fact I prefer wild overgrowth to manicured lawn.  And yes, the dirt beneath my broken fingernails is somewhat permanent–that is a fact.  The lack thereof might be more of an indication that something is out of whack.

In Early American Literature we learned that the woods represented ‘the dark side’—the wild and untamed was no-man’s land to the first European settlers in the ‘New World’.  Little did they know that the indigenous people already inhabiting the land had management systems in place, which were quickly encroached upon by the order-seeking Old Worlders.  To those who crave order, natural systems are messy and undesirable, and the ones who thrive in those untidy systems would likely be categorized as ‘marginal’, (just as ‘those dirty hippies’ and ‘Anarchists’ are labeled now).   Our society revels in drawing lines between the ‘middle’ and the edge—exemplified in the massive variety of television programming highlighting the fringe, from cop show, ‘real’ or fictional, to reality programming focusing on everything from hoarders to gun-toting survivalists.

The founders of a new colony, whatever Utopia of human virtue and happiness they might originally project, have invariably recognized it among their earliest practical necessities to allot a portion of the virgin soil as a cemetery, and another portion as the site of a prison.

NATHANIEL HAWTHORNE, The Scarlet Letter

 HoldSignSND

Who is on the fringe in your world?  Is it Auntie Mabel, of crazy cat lady fame?  Or is it the homeless guy holding the “will work for food” sign on the corner?  In the Florida Bay area we have an entire county of those marginal, fringy types—once a retirement destination, now land of the lost, haven for illicit drug trade—the highway lined with strip malls and strippers—a nutrient-rich soup, for some things.  Many of those who subscribe to permaculture principles would consider themselves as marginal, on a conventional scale, however even those on the fringe have a fringe—the possibilities for edge are everywhere.  And, as any proper queen (edge players, every one) can tell you—you just can’t have too much fringe or froth.  Therein lies one excellent example of ‘edge’ in our world—that of the gender unconventional.  The entire country if not continent has willingly divided on lines of conservative and not-so, based on a book of rules written for a culture thousands of years past.  This is not how species adapt, mind you, but it has proven very effective for filling the coffers of the few, because the way to wealth lies in creating conflict and supplying the war.

Any battleground, however, also grows lots of edges—think of all of the marginal people created by PTSD and war wounds—families torn apart scatter and create new alliances elsewhere.   Those who grew up, as I and my sister did, military brats, moved from place to place without any opportunity to put down solid roots—nothing but edge in our childhood.  This leads to a strong core, adaptability, and also extreme estrangement of any sense of community, outside of family and perhaps others in the same boat.  We’re all marginal, and we have an uncanny ability to find one another in the world—brats like me, and we’re all ‘outsiders’ to some degree.

Like Hester Prynne, heroine of The Scarlet Letter, me might heed the advice of the narrator:

”The scarlet letter was her passport into regions where other women dared not tread. Shame, Despair, Solitude!  These had been her teachers — stern and wild ones — and they had made her strong, but taught her much amiss.”

To truly understand and appreciate the marginal, we must walk, and think, and exist for a time, outside the boundaries of what we were raised to be…to believe—that is how to embrace diversity, and value the marginal.

The Road Not Taken

Two roads diverged in a yellow wood,
And sorry I could not travel both
And be one traveler, long I stood
And looked down one as far as I could
To where it bent in the undergrowth;

Then took the other, as just as fair,
And having perhaps the better claim
Because it was grassy and wanted wear,
Though as for that the passing there
Had worn them really about the same,

And both that morning equally lay
In leaves no step had trodden black.
Oh, I kept the first for another day!
Yet knowing how way leads on to way
I doubted if I should ever come back.

I shall be telling this with a sigh
Somewhere ages and ages hence:
Two roads diverged in a wood, and I,
I took the one less traveled by,
And that has made all the difference.

Robert Frost

Read the Series:

Introduction:  ”Unplugging”

  1. Observe and Interact
  2. Catch and Store Energy
  3. Obtain a Yield
  4. Apply Self-Regulation and Accept Feedback
  5. Use and value renewable resources and services
  6. Produce no waste
  7. Design from patterns to details
  8. Integrate rather than segregate
  9. Use small and slow solutions
  10. Use and value diversity
  11. Use edges and value the marginal
  12. Creatively use and respond to change

 

© Loretta Buckner, 2014, We Grow From Here

Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Loretta Buckner and WeGrowFromHere.com with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.


5 Comments

Integrate Rather than Segregate

Category            Permaculture Principles

‘Many hands make light work’

“…in every aspect of nature, from the internal workings of organisms to whole ecosystems, we find the connections between things are as important as the things themselves. Thus the purpose of a functional and self-regulating design is to place elements in such a way that each serves the needs and accepts the products of other elements.” (Essence of Permaculture:  David Holmgren, et. al.)

This is permaculture design at its core—creating the entire system so that each component is so happy it performs and produces to the greatest capacity.  This goes for plants, animals, and people.  As many of us know first-hand, the people tend to bring in the greatest challenges to system design, because they come saddled with all sorts of expectations, pre-conceived notions, and often plenty of ‘life experience’ which has them convinced they know how everything should look, and behave, and think.  People come with invisible structures of their very own.

Recently it came to me that one of the reasons I found myself exhausted all the time was due to one simple change:  “Build the bridge, not BE the bridge”.  Several years ago, when I was learning about sailing, and how boats behave on the water, I made the mistake of using my arm as a dock line—I do not recommend this, by the way, in fact I strongly advise against it.  I had two others on board with me, and they had already disembarked and were on the dock, without having taken any line with them, so when I realized the boat was drifting away, I panicked and grabbed the dock, ending up suspended by fingers and toes, until came the nasty crunching sound from my shoulder.  I did not land in the water, and it did take six months to heal that arm—lucky for me, I suppose, it was the left arm.  Moral of the story, which any good sailor knows—keep your limbs away from moving parts, and never, ever, leave anything fleshy between a vessel and a dock.  Do NOT be the bridge.  Those connections between things, or people, are certainly of the utmost importance, and it is completely unnecessary for anyone to insert his or her own body parts or even less tangible stuff into that space to create the bridge—our job is to create the design so that the bridge exists, and that is all.

bridge

When we design people systems, it may seem that the danger to our physical bodies is not nearly so much at stake; however the behavior I have witnessed within social media forums might indicate otherwise.  For some unknown reason, when people begin to share their opinions it also seems inherent that certain other ‘cheeky’ body parts are also displayed.  This outcome can be attributed to several factors, most of which have been named above.  People take things personally, and we all ‘hear’ something different, because we all come from different experiences.  This is one reason that “apply self-regulation and accept feedback” is so important in social permaculture systems—we must all be willing to take a step back and understand that the others in the ‘room’ have just as much right and need to be heard as we do.  It is when we make value judgments on others that the finger-pointing starts and suddenly everyone is ‘wrong’.

Why, then, should we attempt to integrate at all, you may ask?  Not only is everything easier with numbers, but there is that other aspect which is revealed in any group—Napolean Hill called this a “Mastermind”, and had a design for what these groups should look like.  I believe in this process, and have participated in a number of different groups of this nature, with varying degrees of yield.  The variables I have observed come in for the following reasons:

  • Lack of commitment from some or all members.  A very basic, bottom-line (or ‘lowest common denominator’ as I like to say), is that all participants must be equally invested in the same desired outcome, also known as the ‘vision’.  Time and time again I have seen groups fail on this one basic point, which is also termed “a lack of alignment”.  Napolean called it “…harmonious cooperation of two or more people who ally themselves for the purpose of accomplishing any given task.” 
  • Lack of leadership.  I have yet to be a part of any group effort where sOMeone did not step up to take charge, at least in the short term.  This does not mean that the organization needs to be hierarchical—indeed, quite the opposite is true—leadership can be voluntary and shifted within the group, in fact it is optimal that each member agree to be the facilitator once in a while.  Learning some leadership skills never hurt anyone, nor does allowing others to take the helm from time to time.  Both positions require self-regulation, leadership more so, otherwise it becomes authoritarian.
  • Poor design.  If the goals of the group are poorly defined, this means the outcome or yield is indeterminate, and the entire process will be scrambled, as the participants each vie for their piece of the pie.  Remember to design from pattern to details, which means take the long view, first—where the bus is going needs to be determined before selecting the road to get there.
  • Unwillingness (aka ‘fear’) to make mistakes.  We all make mistakes.  We have all fallen flat on our faces at least once in our lives—if you haven’t–you need to live a little more.  Those who do more will also make more mistakes.  It’s ok—the only injury is to your ego, and most can do with a bruise or two.  The only caveat to this is when true threat of bodily harm is present—if this is a factor, the design must contain fail-safes to prevent harm.

So, does this all mean that we must integrate with everyone, all the time?  Well, let’s go back to the bus analogy—if you were to board a bus on its way to Tennessee, but you wanted to go to New Orleans, are your desires in alignment with the others on the bus?  The same goes for any other group activity—everybody must at the very least be facing in the same direction, before they get on board.

Read the Series:

Introduction:  ”Unplugging”

  1. Observe and Interact
  2. Catch and Store Energy
  3. Obtain a Yield
  4. Apply Self-Regulation and Accept Feedback
  5. Use and value renewable resources and services
  6. Produce no waste
  7. Design from patterns to details
  8. Integrate rather than segregate
  9. Use small and slow solutions
  10. Use and value diversity
  11. Use edges and value the marginal
  12. Creatively use and respond to change

© Loretta Buckner, 2014, We Grow From Here

Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Loretta Buckner and WeGrowFromHere.com with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.


4 Comments

Apply Self-Regulation and Accept Feedback

Category            Permaculture Principles

“The sins of the fathers are visited upon the children unto the seventh generation.”

Some might read this title as “self-control” and “critique”, and I love the fact that it is addressed early in the principles, because this one is key to understanding social permaculture and ‘invisible structures’.  Heard that one mentioned yet?  It’s permaculture jargon, to be sure—and it’s also something very important to know and pay attention to.  If we are to actually create the kind of change, to transition this entire planet from the energy-sucking waste pit it has become, into the harmonious, beautiful, regenerative place we know it can be—we had better understand something about people, and how they develop these ‘invisible structures’.

Principle #4 does not, in fact, refer to self-control—it is a re-iteration and a deeper understanding of ‘observe and interact’—this is the second turn of the spiral, where we go back and look again with new eyes at what we perceived before.  This is the “Hotel California” mentioned in the last section, where you can check-out but never leave–the part about where we come to recognize that we all come into every situation with our own ideas, experiences, and expectations—which may or may not be met there.

William Butler Yeats (1865-1939)

THE SECOND COMING

Turning and turning in the widening gyre
The falcon cannot hear the falconer;
Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold;
Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world,
The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere
The ceremony of innocence is drowned;
The best lack all conviction, while the worst
Are full of passionate intensity.

Surely some revelation is at hand;
Surely the Second Coming is at hand.
The Second Coming! Hardly are those words out
When a vast image out of Spiritus Mundi
Troubles my sight: a waste of desert sand;
A shape with lion body and the head of a man,
A gaze blank and pitiless as the sun,
Is moving its slow thighs, while all about it
Wind shadows of the indignant desert birds.

The darkness drops again but now I know
That twenty centuries of stony sleep
Were vexed to nightmare by a rocking cradle,
And what rough beast, its hour come round at last,
Slouches towards Bethlehem to be born?

Ok, perhaps a bit overly dramatic, but the fact is—no one likes to be criticized, we all take things personally, and it takes a very long time to get to the point where one can truly self-regulate on a consistent basis—we all have bad days—I’m sure even the Dalai Lama gets irritated once in a while.  The point is to be aware of this rule—that, as permaculturists we strive to maintain a higher standard—one which allows us space to step back and re-evaluate with no judgment.   We ALL make mistakes—what this principle speaks of is the ability to open our minds to the possibility that there may just be another way, one that hadn’t occurred to us before.  This does not mean we need to go around pointing out others’ flaws, no–in fact—noticing what we consider ‘mistakes’ or ‘weaknesses’ or other character flaws can often give us great insight into our own foibles.  If not for community, how little opportunity we would have to grow as individuals!  This is one of the great values to ‘community’, and one of my personal favorite aspects of all of the permaculture courses and convergences I’ve attended—that sharing of ideas, leading to growth of each individual as well as the whole.

Personally, I’m a bit of a hermit—introvert for certain, far more comfortable in my home environment than out with people, as a rule.  There are, however, some acute disadvantages to being a ‘homebody’, which is why I choose to involve myself in many communities.  We think we get it right, those of us who are thinkers and planners and analyzers—but we must actually apply those thoughts and plans and hypothesis, because only half of the equation has taken place—the scientific method requires testing.  Sometimes over, and over and over again, until we get it right—and even then, adjustments must be made.  ‘Organic’ means that the system develops on its own—more of an evolution than an application, and what we do as designers is try to come as close to an organic system as we possibly can, mimicking the patterns of Mother Nature.  We are so embedded by adulthood into the systems we were raised in–the challenge to continually review and revise our social interactions, especially, can be daunting.

Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold;    Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world,”

 

If this had happened, more, at the Cuba convergence—we would not have spent half our time in lines, or waiting on buses.  We might not have missed half of the farms we intended to see.  Perhaps we might have had the time to implement some permaculture project designs, if we had not been forced to contribute so much energy to helping provide sustenance to those with specific dietary preferences, or translation for language barriers.  The old saying ‘when in Rome, do as the Romans do’ no longer applies in the world we are creating—not if Rome is the one responsible for the breakdown of society, the economy, or our planet.  Now is when we make the choice to make a different choice, and that means constantly questioning our own thoughts and actions, and learning to listen carefully to others.

The best lack all conviction, while the worst
Are full of passionate intensity.”

This is us, after all, isn’t it—permaculturists, on the whole?  We are so fired up, especially during and after one of our gatherings, that the energy must dissipate somehow, somewhere.  Often that appears to be on one another, or on an unsuspecting public, still feeling their way along with blinders on.  It is our responsibility to help them to clear vision, however, not to bat them over the head with concepts they have no tools yet to understand.  (This, by the way, is me speaking of myself—this is where I fall down, over and over again—in making the assumption that the person I’m having a conversation with has come to that place having traveled the same road, which is rarely the case.)  So, I find myself applying this principle again and again—self regulation, and the harder one—accepting feedback, which I have learned to ask for when appropriate.

Here are four words to remember and to use with impunity whenever faced with the necessity to change some course of action or design—four simple words, which can change the outcome of any difficult situation:

“I made a mistake.”

Now, the next step is simple—make a new choice, change the line of the swale, the angle of the gutter, the composition of the soil, the mode of communication—change your mind, and others may as well.

Image

“Two roads diverged in a wood and I – I took the one less traveled by, and that has made all the difference.”

Robert Frost

(Or, as my dad likes to say:  “If you see a fork in the road, what do you do?”  …”pick it up.”)                              Image

Thanks to my dear friend Jemma Sinclair, for always helping me to see the road less traveled, and to remain happy with that choice.

Read the Series:

Introduction:  “Unplugging”

  1. Observe and Interact
  2. Catch and Store Energy
  3. Obtain a Yield
  4. Apply Self-Regulation and Accept Feedback
  5. Use and value renewable resources and services
  6. Produce no waste
  7. Design from patterns to details
  8. Integrate rather than segregate
  9. Use small and slow solutions
  10. Use and value diversity
  11. Use edges and value the marginal
  12. Creatively use and respond to change

     

© Loretta Buckner, 2014, We Grow From Here

Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Loretta Buckner and WeGrowFromHere.com with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.